HIV Foundation Health Tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins: medical professionals are sure that vegetables make us sick

Tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins: medical professionals are sure that vegetables make us sick

Grains and vegetables protect themselves against predators and diseases with special substances. They are unsuitable for human digestion and make us sick, says a US nutritionist. Is he right?

According to popular belief, those who eat vegetables, fruit and whole grain products every day have a particularly healthy diet – and thus possibly make a dangerous mistake, get fat and sick. The American cardiologist and nutritionist Steven R. Gundry is convinced of this, as he explains in his bestseller “The Plant Paradox”, which has also been available as a German version since this year (Steven R. Gundry: “Bad vegetables. How healthy Food makes us sick ”, Beltz).

Vegetable plants use lectins for defense

Lectins are said to be responsible for the harmful effects of supposedly healthy foods. These are certain proteins that plants have developed for defense so that they are spared from fungi, bacteria and parasites. In fact, lectins act similarly to antibiotics and can be toxic, especially when raw.

The substances can harm people

Lectins make green potatoes and raw beans inedible . The best-known lectin is gluten, avoided by many because it can lead to bowel inflammation and celiac disease . Gluten, known as adhesive protein, illustrates the negative properties of lectins particularly impressively: These proteins are extremely easy to bond, stick to cells and tissues, preferably in the intestine. The mucous membrane cells change, the intestinal wall becomes permeable for pollutants, which in turn can make the entire organism sick.

Sick from lectins – from Alzheimer’s to rheumatism

But not only celiac disease is caused by the harmful effects of lectins. The proteins bind to red blood cells, thicken the blood and thus promote arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Steven Gundry also explains many other diseases of civilization with the negative effects of lectins.

Because they can actually dock on all tissues, such as the pancreas, joints, bronchi, nerves, brain, and the immune system attacks them there as intruders, autoimmune diseases would develop: diabetes , arthritis and rheumatism, asthma , Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s .

These foods are high in lectins

The doctor therefore promotes a diet that is as free from lectins as possible (LFE, lectin-free diet). The negative list of foods rich in lectin includes the following products:

  • loaf
  • Potatoes and potato products
  • rice
  • pasta
  • Beans and legumes
  • soy
  • tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • pumpkin
  • Grain
  • Vegetable oils
  • sugar

Steven Gundry also largely avoids fish and meat, or at least restricts consumption – because breeding animals are mainly fed with corn and soy. Both types of food naturally contain lectins. If they are genetically modified, however, they provide even more of it to protect the plants from pests even better. With the feed they get into the animal and thus into the meat that is put on the plate.

How to eat a lectin-free diet

The negative list is long, but there are also a number of foods that contain little or no lectins. The positive list of desirable foods suggests, among other things:

  • Coconut oil
  • Coconut milk
  • Hazelnuts
  • Walnuts
  • Sweet chestnuts
  • Olives
  • Tigernut flour, chestnut flour
  • Dark chocolate
  • cream cheese
  • Goat cheese
  • butter
  • cream
  • Crustaceans, fish (rare)
  • certain types of fruit in small quantities (apples, pears, blueberries, raspberries, kiwi, plums, peaches, citrus fruits)
  • Cabbage vegetables of all kinds
  • artichokes
  • garlic
  • Onions
  • Meat (no more than 125 gr per day)
  • Eggs
  • Sweeteners such as erythritol, stevia, xylitol
  • 1 glass of red wine per day

Of course, all products should come from organic cultivation or rearing if possible, i.e. have the best organic quality.

Lectin-free diet – new fad diet or serious prevention and therapy?

At first glance, the impression arises: after fructose, gluten and carbohydrates, lectins are now supposed to be the bad nutrients that lead to obesity and make you sick. But the impression is deceptive. Steven Gundry’s observations should probably be taken seriously. There is some evidence for his theses:

  • It has long been known that lectins are unfavorable and are therefore even referred to as ” anti-nutrients ” in nutritional science . But this fact has had little impact on nutrition plans and diets until now.
  • Initial studies show that lectins can be linked to rheumatism and Parkinson’s disease .

However, there is (still) a lack of larger studies on the extent to which lectins can promote obesity and illness. However, in a self-experiment, Steven Gundry lost 35 kilograms within a year and at the same time lowered his high blood pressure , and the arthritis had also disappeared.

The doctor treated around 1,000 patients on the basis of these positive experiences with the LFE. He observed 200 of them as part of a study . For six months, the patients who all had cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease ate according to this diet. After completing the examination, her heart function and blood values ​​had improved significantly.

Conclusion: It should definitely not be a fashion diet. However, LFE cannot be easily integrated into everyday life, the usual nutrition plan has to be fundamentally redesigned. But to make this as uncomplicated as possible, the doctor gives many tips and simple to fine recipes in his new guide on “bad vegetables”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Post

These tricks help against the bellyThese tricks help against the belly

From the age of 30, German men are growing rapidly. It doesn’t look good and is a health hazard. Nevertheless, the stronger sex has difficulties with weight loss programs. FOCUS Online explains why this is so and which diet works best for men.

Surveys by the Federal Statistical Office show that Germany’s men are getting fatter year after year: If the body mass index is used as a benchmark, 62 percent of men are currently overweight (BMI over 25) and 18 percent are obese (BMI over 30) . And while only a third of the 20 to 25 year olds are overweight, the proportion among the over 50 year olds rises to more than 70 percent. Among women, 43 percent carry too many pounds around – but the proportion of people who are overweight shrinks slightly every year.

Visceral belly fat is a health risk

But while many of the overweight women have the word “lose weight” at least in the back of their minds, the term “diet” bounces off most men. Somehow, around 30, they gradually lose their firm body, but they feel comfortable with their figure, which they do not find too fat at all. Men seem to be more tolerant of their paunch than women of their love handles.

This has nothing to do with reason, because it is now known that so-called visceral belly fat in particular poses a health risk. The metabolically active tissue releases inflammatory substances and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and erectile dysfunction.

The traditional image of the man promotes obesity

Papa gets the biggest piece of meat because a man has to eat properly – this age-old belief persists in Germany. And so men eat an average of 1.1 kilograms of meat every week. That is twice as much as for women and twice as much as recommended for a healthy diet. In addition, there are plenty of carbohydrates in the form of pasta, potatoes or white bread, sausage, butter and cheese – and the plates are often scooped up on the “all-you-can-eat” principle.

Many men get fat because they eat and drink too much of the wrong things, for example six times as much beer as women. And they stay fat because it is very difficult to change established eating habits.

Men need a lot of motivation to diet

Doctors and nutritionists find time and again that men rarely lose weight because they find themselves too fat. It almost always takes an external spark for the average man to change something in his lifestyle, for example when the doctor diagnoses diabetes or a heart problem, or when a relationship breaks up.

This was also the result of an evaluation of two major diet programs by the British health authority NHS. And there were even more men-specific issues on the subjectLose weight:

  • Only ten percent of men had received a referral from their doctor for the programs.
  • But: Once men start with such a measure, they develop ambition to lose weight and get out less often than women.
  • Men are more likely to respond to programs that avoid the word “diet” and place great emphasis on exercise.

Proper diet and exercise

Weight loss results mainly from diet changes. However, if men also expand their muscle cushion in the process, the effect is increased because of the high energy requirements of the muscles. Men should exercise all muscle groups in the body and not just squint at the fast-growing biceps.

A sporting program that includes a mix of strength and endurance is often better accepted by men than women. Sport should be fun in any case, because after actively losing weight, exercise can stabilize the desired weight – without the man having to constantly watch the calories.

What men should eat for weight loss is no different from a diet for women:

1. less red / fatty meat, sausage and animal fat

2. more vegetables

3. less white flour and sugar (carbohydrates)

4. more white / lean meat, tofu, or legumes (protein)

5. no alcohol

Intermittent fasting – as invented for men

Intermittent fasting is a suitable diet method for those who like it simple and uncomplicated. With the simple principle, there are time windows for food intake, which alternate with fasting episodes. The fat metabolism is activated, excess pounds can melt – especially if you keep an eye on the calories.

  • The popular “16: 8” method is suitable as a permanent nutritional principle: During the day, people eat in an 8-hour window, two to three meals without snacks in between. The nocturnal eating break is extended to 16 hours – ideal for men who do not like breakfast.
  • The “5: 2” interval fasting allows you to eat normally on five days, then there are a maximum of 500 calories on two days.
  • The “1: 1” method is considered to be the most difficult to stick to: alternately eat one day and one fast.

For men (and women), the combination of two protein shakes and a normal meal a day is a good start to losing weight. US presenter and comedian Jimmy Kimmel lost over twelve kilos before he switched to intermittent fasting “5: 2”.

The man’s body is the best weapon against obesity

Once men have decided to lose weight, they enjoy a great advantage over women. Men are taller, heavier and have more muscles – as a result, their bodies burn more energy even when they are resting.

If they also save calories, they lose more weight and lose weight faster than women. This was shown by a study with 2000 male and female participants who had exactly the same general conditions. After eight weeks, the men saw 16 percent more weight loss. Their bodies cling less to fat deposits, which in women are a stubborn reservoir for pregnancy and breastfeeding.

At 20, 40, 60 and 70 years: how to eat healthily at any ageAt 20, 40, 60 and 70 years: how to eat healthily at any age

Sometimes the body needs more protein, sometimes more carbohydrates and after a certain age it should be less overall. If you want to eat healthily for a lifetime, you should always keep an eye on your age when shopping and cooking.

According to today’s recommendations, a healthy diet consists of plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit, good oils, as little industrially processed food as possible, economical consumption of animal products, white flour and sugar – from children to old people.

So there is only healthy and unhealthy diet, but no age-related diet. But: Over the years and depending on the situation in life, the need and utilization of nutrients change. And here age definitely plays a role. For example, the nutritionists at the University of California in San Diego have put together an overview of what to look out for .

This is what matters from 20 to 40:

The basal metabolic rate is highest in young adults, which means that the body consumes the most calories even without physical activity. At this age, many people can “eat what they want” without getting fat. At least at this age, the body forgives a few fast-food orgies and other antics.

In general, it is important to build up muscles, bones and connective tissue between the ages of 20 and 30 , also with the help of a sensible diet. Everyone can benefit from this basis in later years, when it is no longer so easy to maintain fitness.

In these years, special attention to nutrition requires more of a life circumstance for women: pregnancy.

Special dietary instructions for young pregnant women only

In addition to a diet full of high-quality nutrients and the natural avoidance of tobacco and alcohol , it is important to ensure an optimal supply of vitamins, minerals and trace elements so that the child develops well. Eating for two, on the other hand, is completely unnecessary and wrong.

Therefore, all expectant mothers should take folic acid in the first 3 months of pregnancy . Iodine tablets can also be useful. And vegans also have to pay attention to a number of micronutrients that they lack by avoiding animal foods: iron, zinc , calcium, vitamins B12, B2 and D as well as an appropriate intake of omega-3 fatty acids.

This is important from 40:

From the age of 40, the metabolism begins to slow down. While the body can usually break down too much sugar and carbohydrates by the age of 30, it loses this ability by the age of 40 at the latest. Suddenly, an unchanged diet is reflected in the stomach and hips.

Anyone who is only now finding an adequate diet can still set the course for a healthy future.

Anyone who has already eaten reasonably healthy should now pay more attention to the following elements:

  • Fruits and vegetables in bright colors – the antioxidants they contain act as cell protection with an antiaging effect in the body.
  • more whole grains on the menu
  • a (small) portion of red meat twice a week – good for building muscle , also important for women because of the prevention of iron deficiency
  • Vegetarians should pay particular attention to green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale or Swiss chard.

Here are some things to watch out for in your 50s and 60s:

Now begins a dangerous age for cardiovascular problems such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Anyone who has neglected their diet and has not taken much exercise must expect type 2 diabetes .

It is now important to have a diet that keeps the blood sugar level stable and prevents deposits in the blood vessels. It should be low in cholesterol, high in fiber and slowly digestible carbohydrates, so:

  • lots of vegetables
  • little animal fat
  • no sugared soft drinks
  • little white flour products

In addition:

  • nuts
  • Good oils (olive, flaxseed)
  • Fish (omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D)
  • Low-fat dairy products (calcium)

Changes in hormones accelerate the loss of calcium from the bones. The substitution of calcium plus vitamin D can now counteract the threat of osteoporosis . Because of the breakdown of estrogen during menopause , it occurs earlier and more frequently in women. But bone loss threatens men too.

An omega-3 supplement can benefit heart health if someone doesn’t eat sea fish. Omega-3 fatty acids stabilize the blood vessels.

Proper nutrition with 70 plus:

With age, various physiological and psychological changes occur that directly affect nutritional needs. The taste buds and appetite decrease, as does the desire to cook freshly and by yourself.

The body is less able to absorb and use many vitamins and minerals. With age, the digestive juices in the stomach change, reducing the absorption of iron, calcium, and vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid.

Long-term use of prescription drugs can decrease the absorption of certain nutrients.

Less calories, but not less nutrients

Seniors need fewer calories than younger people, but no fewer nutrients. Protein becomes important again in old age: it can delay muscle loss in old age, especially when combined with strength training.

As a rule of thumb, one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight per day . However, it should not be exclusively protein from meat, as it promotes inflammation, especially in the joints.

Because digestion becomes sluggish with age, fiber is important for the 70+ generation. A teaspoon of psyllium husks are a recommended alternative to the vegetables or whole grains that would be necessary for an optimal supply. To do this, seniors have to drink plenty, even if that is difficult for many.

“Cancer cells are fed” – underestimated health risks lurk in meat and sausage“Cancer cells are fed” – underestimated health risks lurk in meat and sausage

Iron deficiency is often discussed. There is hardly any talk about the opposite, the frequent overloading with heme iron, the iron form made from red meat and sausage. It promotes the common diseases of diabetes, cancer and arteriosclerosis. FOCUS Online shows how you can meet your iron needs in a healthy way.

The trace element iron is indispensable for a number of vital metabolic functions in the body. As a component of hemoglobin in the red blood cells, it supplies every body cell with oxygen. Iron deficiency, which manifests itself in anemia, exhaustion, susceptibility to infection, affects around 20 percent of women and ten percent of men in Germany. The higher risk for women is explained by menstruation and decreases accordingly when the childbearing phase of life is over.

Many people have an excess of iron – and know nothing about it

Iron deficiency is known and many nutrition-conscious people pay attention to adequate iron intake. However, significantly more people could have anything but an iron deficiency, namely too much of this trace element. Probably very few people know about it, although it carries a high risk of disease.

Heme iron and non-heme iron: these are the differences

First and foremost, it is important for these relationships – there are the two known, different forms of iron, only one of which can be hazardous to health:

1. Heme iron , i.e. bivalent iron (Fe), mainly found in red meat and sausage. Heme iron has a high bioavailability, the body can use at least 20 percent from food.

2. Non-heme iron , trivalent iron (Fe3), from plant-based nutrient suppliers such as legumes, whole grains, nuts, oil seeds and various types of vegetables. Non-heme iron must first be oxidized to some form of Fe in the small intestine in order for the body to use it. In this way, only around five percent of the iron from food comes into play.

The iron requirement per day is 15 milligrams for women and 10 milligrams for men.

Underestimated health risk heme iron

What is certain is that most people in industrialized nations have at least a sufficient supply of the trace element. Due to our meat and sausage-heavy diet, a large part is even oversupplied with heme iron, and thus risks diseases. Various studies indicate these relationships .

“We assume that too much heme iron can have negative health consequences through eating meat,” explains Matthias Riedl, board member of the Association of German Nutritionists (BDEM) and diabetologist, nutritionist, internist, managing director and medical director at Medicum Hamburg.

The human organism is not prepared for high meat consumption

Normally, a complex mechanism of substances in the liver and intestines controls the iron level. If too much iron storage protein ferritin is measured, the body slows down absorption. “This does not work adequately with large amounts of heme iron, the body continues to absorb it, simply because this form of iron is extremely easy to use,” says the expert.

The nutritionist explains that the cause lies in our evolutionary history. Up until two million years ago, humans were purely plant-eaters, only then did they add animal consumption. That was sometimes more, mostly less meat – definitely a lot less than is regularly eaten today. The human organism is not prepared for this.

High consumption of heme iron feeds cancer cells

The excess iron is then deposited in the pancreas, liver and spleen, which can put stress on the organs. But that’s not all. “Heme iron can promote mutations via certain chemical compounds – for example in intestinal cells, but also in other cells,” warns the internist.

In addition, these compounds have a cytotoxic effect, so they can not only change cells, but also damage them. “And cancer cells, on the other hand, are properly fed by heme iron, so to speak,” says the expert. Malignant cells have a high demand for this trace element. A high consumption of heme iron means that existing cancer cells grow better and are stronger against the immune system.

Meat lovers are more likely to develop diabetes and arteriosclerosis

In addition to the connection between heme iron and cancer, many nutritional studies have shown two other negative effects of the “meat iron”:

1. Numerous studies show that people who consume a lot of sausage and meat are particularly likely to have type 2 diabetes .

2. In addition, this dietary preference often leads to arteriosclerosis , with the well-known secondary diseases of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.

“If people don’t eat ‘appropriately’, they get sick”

The higher the meat consumption, the higher the risks for cancer, diabetes and arteriosclerosis. What actually stands behind it: “If people do not eat ‘species-appropriate’, i.e. eat too much red meat and sausage and thus too much heme iron, they will get sick,” warns Matthias Riedl. It is well known that primitive peoples who still eat originally – eat very little meat and no sausage – do not have arteriosclerosis at all, for example.

Trivalent iron from plants is converted into bivalent iron

So heme iron has a rather negative effect on the body. Non-heme iron, on the other hand, does not pose these health risks – but is converted into bivalent iron in the body in order to make it available. Doesn’t it then become as unfavorable as bivalent heme iron? “No, because the trivalent iron from plants is converted into a bivalent iron, but not into heme iron,” explains the expert.

Providing the body with healthy iron – vegetables and fruits with non-heme iron

In order to provide the body with sufficient iron without meat, there are a number of plant-based foods that have a high content of non-heme iron, such as:

  • Lentils around 2.7mg / 100gr
  • Chickpeas around 2.7mg / 100gr
  • Peas 1,5mg / 100gr
  • Spinach 3,6mg / 100gr
  • Chanterelles 6.5mg / 100gr
  • Elderberry 1.6mg / 100gr
  • Pine nuts 9.2mg / 100gr
  • Millet 6.9mg / 100gr
  • Flaxseed, ground 8,4mg / 100gr
  • Amaranth 8.9mg / 100gr

Spinach contains a comparatively high amount of iron for a plant-based food, but at the same time the substances it contains can prevent it from being absorbed by the body. Beans or lentils are therefore better suited as a vegetarian source of iron.

Intelligently upgrade the bioavailability of iron from vegetables and fruits

Sure, none of these foods provide as much iron as meat. “The availability of iron from plant-based foods can be increased by cleverly combining the ingredients in a meal,” says Matthias Riedl. Vitamin C, for example, improves absorption. Suggestion for a corresponding daily plan:

  • In the morning: oatmeal / muesli with fruit, a glass of orange or lemon juice for breakfast,
  • Lunch: millet salad with paprika (the pods are extremely rich in vitamin C),
  • In the evening: whole wheat pasta with broccoli or parsley pesto

Coffee and tea inhibit iron availability

However, there are also plant substances that have an inhibiting effect on iron absorption. These are phytates and polyphenols, for example, these plant substances are contained in coffee and tea. So avoid these drinks during, immediately before and after a meal containing iron. In wholemeal products, on the other hand, the phytate content plays a lesser role, as they convince with their high iron content.

Cover your iron requirement healthily, certain meats are also allowed

“Those who follow a purely vegetarian / vegan diet can still get too little iron, especially women are at risk here,” says the expert.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women in particular should take preparations if they have a proven iron deficiency. Otherwise there is a ‘species-appropriate’ solution for everyone: That means a small, moderate meat meal per week, preferably poultry meat, because white meat is not statistically associated with the disease risks mentioned.